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Category Archives for "Technical Writing"

Good or Bad, Writing Is Subjective

In my last post, I wrote, “…the opinion that something written is good or bad is subjective” and I promised to explain what I meant by that statement, so here it is.

Many writers give up at the first sign of rejection. They let their emotions take over, yet this is the time when you, as a writer, need to let your business head remain in control and start looking for some answers that may help you avoid rejection in the future.

While I’ll admit that some editors help fuel the sense of rejection by merely sending a form rejection letter, writers add fuel to those rejections by supposing that it means their article isn’t any good.

If an editor writes a rejection letter, your first clue about why the article was rejected may be there. If you’re really lucky, the editor may mention why she rejected the article. Or she may suggest a different slant. A suggestion like this may be an invitation to rewrite the article and resubmit it. So start looking for clues in each rejection. They may lead to future writing assignments with that editor.

Dip Your Pen into the Inkwell and tell us what you learned from a rejection letter you received.

The Writers Inkwell Muse

1

A Cure for Writer’s Block—Part 2

A Cure for Writer’s Block — Part I

Writer’s Block often strikes unexpectedly. I’ll be writing just fine and then, nothing. The words won’t come. They’re on vacation. No contact phone. No email. Nothing. Not a word.

When I first started writing for a living, my frustration level would rise quickly and fear would set in. “How can I not have the words to write?” I’d ask myself. “I’ve been writing ever since they put a pencil in my hand and taught me how to write my name in kindergarten!” That would only make it worse.

I knew I needed a more effective approach. It took a while, but eventually I began to find ways to cure writer’s block. Once I realized that it was not permanent, I was able to put aside the almost choking fear that would swallow up my ability to think clearly and calmly when I was suffering a bout of writer’s block.

I began to view writer’s block as a boulder blocking the way of my car on the Pacific Coast Highway. What’s the cure for that? Move the boulder. Go around it. Walk around it. Climb the hill. Go over it. Turn around and take another road.

Are you beginning to see that there are multiple solutions? The beauty of multiple solutions is that you only need one, so you can continue your journey. How I cure bouts of writer’s block depends on a lot of things, including where I am physically at the time (home, a client’s office, an airplane, or someplace else), what I’m writing (or supposed to be writing) about, how I’m feeling (happy, sad, fearful, irritated), what’s going on in my life and in my world…I could go on, but you get the idea.

One of my most subtle cures is to write about something else. The other day, I was working on a technical document for a client and the words wouldn’t come. Instead of trying to force them, I switched gears and hand wrote a thank you note to a friend who had done an unexpected favor for me a few days before.

After I finished writing the note, I returned to my computer and there they were—technical words—flowing smoothly, logically, and effectively. Sure, this was a simple block and a simple cure. What matters is that it worked.

This is the second of several ways to cure writer’s block. As I compile the various methods I use, I will share them with you.

Please dip your pen into the Inkwell and let us know how you cure writer’s block.

Write On With Confidence!
The Writers Inkwell Muse

2

Writing for a Living

Most writers have second jobs.

That’s right. The majority of people who claim to be writers do something other than write to earn the bulk of their income. Why? Because writing is a tough business. Didn’t I write that before, in an earlier post? It really is.

Not only that. So many people aspire to be writers that the competition is fierce, so employers (or clients) can pick and choose who they hire for a job or a freelance project. Consequently, because so many people want to be writers, the pay is incredibly low. Except for the Jackie Collins and Steven Kings of the writing world or technical writers who generally earn a higher income thanks to the expertise they bring to a high-demand profession.

There are a lot of options, if you’re interested in being a technical writer. Think of a product, any product. Now contact that manufacturer to find out if they’re hiring. Someone has to write and format the user guide.

So dip your pen into the Writers Inkwell and

Write On With Confidence!

The Writers Inkwell Muse